Ikera

Pure water

Problem

Hydrogen production and some industries require high quality water, which is not always readily available in the needed quantity or quality.

Solution

With IKERA RD8 technology we can provide distilled and purer water coming from any water source including seawater, black water, wastewater, pig slurry and even sewage among many others.

Process

An overview of the process:

Thermal energy is the main source of energy used, this can be generated from non-renewable sources and renewable energy such as CSP, MINI-CSP, FVT, geothermal, biomass, waste heat or a mixture of several. If sewage is the origin mix, the dry part can be used as biomass for the same process, giving up to 90% of the thermal energy needed.

The original water source is first pumped into a homogenisation tank, to continue to the IKERA RD8 physical reactor. Then, very high quality water is evaporated, free of solids or bacteria. After condensation this water can be used for the production of hydrogen.

The solid parts obtained from the original water source can be stored, disposed of or valorised depending on the water source. The humidity level of these solid parts can be as low as 0,2%.

The energy cost of water depends mainly on the thermal source used. Because this technology does not require membranes and  has low maintenance requirements, the operating costs can be very low.

Situation

We have carried out viability studies into all types of water, seawater, grey water, black water sewage… achieving the desired parameters of quality in all of them. 

We are looking for industrial partners or venture capital for industrial scaling. 

In the case of hydrogen production our involvement is only in the production of high quality / pure water, not the hydrogen itself. 

Readings of interest

Rystad Energy.

‘Vast majority’ of green hydrogen projects may require water desalination, potentially driving up costs

https://www.rechargenews.com/energy-transition/vast-majority-of-green-hydrogen-projects-may-require-water-desalination-potentially-driving-up-costs/2-1-1070183

Energypost.eu